Licentiate in Theology

Admission

The scholarship and boarding arrangements for Licentiate students are given only for the first two years of the course. L.Th. dissertations should be submitted to the Institute within five years from the day of registration in the L.Th. course. If not, a renewal of registration is required.

There will be an entrance examination for those students who hold B.Th. from universities and institutes other than Catholic Universities and Institutes.

The faculty is directed to secure a caution deposit of a minimum of Rs 1000.00 from L.Th. and D.Th. Students.

a) Courses of Specialization
1. Lecentiate in Dogmatic-Moral Theology
2. Lecentiate in Spiritual Theology
3. Lecentiate in Biblical Theology
4. Lecentiate in Pastoral Theology and Counselling.

b) Eligibility
1. The student should hold a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology from an Institute recognized by the Pontifical Institute. The course is open to Catholics and non-Catholics, men and women.
2. Letter of authorization/permission from the concerned Superior is to be submitted.
3. The language requirements:
    a. Proficiency in English
    b. Students should have done, if not, should do a basic course in Greek and Hebrew in the case of those who do the Licentiate in Biblical Theology.

c) Registration

To get registered to the Licentiate programme the candidate has to fill-in duly the application form provided by the Institute. The application form can be obtained from PIA Office at request.
The duly filled-in application form, attached with a passport-size photo has to be submitted to the PIA office.
Each filled-in application form has to be accompanied by the approval /no-objection letter of the Bishop or the Provincial Superior or the Superior In-charge.
Photo-copies of all the relevant certificates, mark lists and documents of other studies accomplished have to be submitted at the time of registration.
The students are expected to participate in every academic activity of the institute, which pertains to their respective field of study.

d) Attendance

Students must attend all lectures without neglect, carry out all prescribed academic assignments and participate in the regular activities of the Institute. For any period of absence, the Director or Dean of Studies is to be informed before-hand. Those who are absent for more than one third of expected attendance will have to repeat the course.

e) Scope and Place of the Course

1. The course is intended to provide the students with an indepth grasp of the subjects of their specialization. This is also a comprehensive way of understanding theology through interdisciplinary research.

2. The students are expected to acquire methodological skills through guided research.

3. The classes will be organized in Carmelgiri and Mangalapuzha Campuses.

f) Examinations

1. The student shall do the examination in individual courses according to the prescribed schedule and mode.

2. Before entering the final comprehensive examinations, the student must have passed all the examinations and have completed all other requirements.

3. The final comprehensive examinations for L.Th. Degree will be written and oral.
Written Examination: The candidate submits 6 topics of which 3 are taken by lot at the time of examination and the candidate writes on one for a duration of 3 hours.
Oral Examination: The candidate submits 18 topics from the subjects covered during the course. The Faculty chooses 10 topics out of this list and 3 Professors ask questions on these for 10 minutes each.

4. The topic for dissertation is chosen at the beginning of the III semester. It is to be approved by the Syndicate. If the dissertation is not submitted in 2 years from the date of approval, the process has to be repeated and the new approval is to be sought from the Syndicate.

5. Four copies of the dissertation should be submitted to the office at least 4 weeks before the final oral examination.

6. The dissertation shall be defended before a panel of examiners appointed by the Syndicate.

7. The defense of the dissertation is as follows: The candidate is given 20 minutes to expose the material. The director examines him/her for 20 minutes, the second reader for 15 minutes and the third reader 10 minutes. There is provision for questions also from the public for 5 minutes.

8. The final grading shall be based on the results of the courses, seminars, book reviews, the dissertation and the comprehensive examinations (written & oral) as given below: Courses (1 point per credit) 26 points
Seminars 08 points
Evaluation of Literature (10 Books Review) 10 points
Comprehensive Written 15 points
Comprehensive Viva Voce 15 points
Dissertation 20 points
Defence 06 points

9. The dissertation carries hundred marks in all: eighty percent for the written work and twenty percent for the defence.

10. L.Th dissertation should have not less than 12000 words (ca.100 pages). It has to be printed.

11.The candidate should pass in all the prescribed subjects, seminars, valuation of literature, dissertation and final comprehensive examinations with a minimum of 60% marks.

12.Certificate of Licentiate Degree in Theology will be issued only after the verification of the aforesaid norms and conditions.

g) Organization of Masters in Theology

1. L.Th in Theology is offered in four branches: Dogmatic-Moral Theology, Spiritual Theology, Biblical Theology and Pastoral Theology and Counselling

2. The L.Th. programme is a four-semester course. One has to do 44 credits in all of courses, seminars and book reviews (1credit=16 school hours).

3. The courses are divided into Common Courses (CC), Courses of Spcialization (ST/SP/PC), Book Reviews and Seminars (STS/SPS/PCS) and Electives (E). Those who do specialization in any of the four branches said above have to take courses from these five section as follows.

i) Ten credits from CC (Five Courses)
ii) Ten credits from specialization (Five Courses) (ST/SP/PC)
iii) Eight credits of Seminar (Four Seminars) (STS/SPS/PCS)
iv) Six credits from the Electives (Three Courses) (E). The electives can also be from courses of specialization.
v) Ten credits of Book Review (Ten Books)

4. The student will not be allowed to do more than 30 credits in the first year (in the first two semesters).

5. The students can fix the courses in consultation with the head of the department, assigned by the Intitute. However they can choose the branch of specialization in consultation with the general Co-ordinator of the L.Th. Programme.

A) Common Courses for L.Th (CC)
Co-ordinator : Dr. Joy Arakkal

CC 101 Biblical Interpretation down through
the Centuries Thondiparambil J.
CC 102 Church as the Mystery of Communion Gregory R.B.
CC 103 The Sacraments and the Divinization of the World Thoppil A.
CC 104 Catholic Theology of Religions Kundukulam V.
CC 105 Sermon on the Mountain Nalpathilchira J.
CC 106 Pauline Spirituality: Key Concepts and Recent Trends Maleparambil J.
CC 107 The Theology of Mission in Synoptic Gospels Nalpathilchira J.
CC 108 Biblical Theology: Theological Trends and Issues Maleparambil J.
CC 109 The History and Development of Theology Rolden J.
CC 110 Milestones in the history of Moral Theology Illathuparampil M.
CC 111Political Theology Rolden J.
CC 112 Contemporary Issues in Sacramental Theology Pulickal S.
CC 113 Theology of Religions Kundukulam V.
CC 114 The Doctirne of the Person of Christ Valluvassery C.
CC 115 Advanced Reflection on Justice Chennatt B.


B) Specialization in Systematic Theology (ST)
Head of the Department : Dr. Gregory R. B.
ST 101 Theology of Grace in the context of Ecumenism R.B. Gregory
ST 102 Postmodernism and Religion Kundukulam V.
ST 103 Christology in the Asian Context Panjikaran S.
ST 104 Theology of Ministry and Leadership in the Church Gregory R.B.
ST 105 The Theology of Presence in the Book of Exodus Mayyattil J.
ST 106 Origin and Theological Development of the Nicene Creed Kadeparambil A.
For Systematic Theology, the distribution of the credits is as follows:
Courses in Theology General (10 x 2) : 20 Credits
Special courses in Systematic Theology (5x 2) : 10 Credits
Seminars (2 x 2) : 04 Credits
Book Review (10 Books) : 10 Credits


C) Specialization in Spiritual Theology (SP)
Head of the Department : Dr. Jose Oliapurath

M.Th in Spirituality, conducted by the Pontifical Institute of Theology and Philosophy, Alwaye (PIA) provides the students with opportunities to specialize in Spiritual Theology, This course is intended to train and prepare the students to teach theology, with the specialization in Spiritual Theology, in seminaries, institutions of higher learning and in houses of formation.

The Master’s degree in Spirituality comprises 2 years of research, reflection and study, with special emphasis on Biblical and Contemporary Spirituality. The course, consists of lectures, seminars, field work, learning of foreign languages and the furnishing of a scientific dissertation, which is to be defended at the end of the course. It offers opportunities to the students for personal study and research under the guidance of competent professors.

The degree offered by the Institute at the completion of the course qualify candidates for admission to the Doctoral Study in any ecclesiastical faculty of theology in India and abroad.

Special Courses
SP 101 Spirituality of the Gospels Kaithakottil J.
SP 102 Spirituality: Historical Evolution Mundolickal P.
SP 103 Patristic Spirituality and Monasticism Kadeparambil A.
SP 104 Contemporary Spirituality Mundolickal P.
SP 105 The Progressive Stages of Prayer Valungal A.
SP 106 Spirituality of Wisdom Liturature Therath A.
SP 107 Spirituality and Eccumenism and dialogue Sugun L.

For Spiritual Theology, the distribution of the credits is as follows:

Courses in Theology General (10 x 2) : 20 Credits
Special courses in Spiritual Theology (5x 2) : 10 Credits
Seminars (2 x 2) : 04 Credits
Book Review (10 Books) : 10 Credits

D) Specialization in Biblical Theology
Head of the Department : Dr. J. Nalpathilchira

“The study of the sacred page is the soul of sacred theology” (DV 24). Licentiate in Biblical Theology, offered at the Ponifical Insititute of Theology and Philosophy, Alwaye (PIA) is designed to provide a foundation for research and teaching Bible and Theology.

The Licentiate in Biblical Theology comprises 2 years of research, reflection and study, with particualar emphasis on Biblical Languages, Hermeneutics and Biblical Exegesis. Special attention will be given to the issues of canonical criticism, narrative reading, and the use of Scripture in the construction of theological arguments. The course consists of lectures, seminars and the furnishing of a scientific dissertation, which is to be defended at the end of the course. It offers opportunities to the students for personal study and research under the guidance of competent professors.

For Biblical Theology, the distribution of the credits is as follows:
Biblical Languages (6 x 2) : 12 Credits
Background Courses (3 x 2) : 06 Credits
Seminars (2 x 2) : 04 Credits
Exegetical Courses (9 x 2) : 18 Credits
Book Review (4 Books) : 04 Credits


Semester 1
BT 101 Biblical Greek I Achandy J.
BT 102 Biblical Hebrew I Chanikuzhy J.
BT 103 Exegetical Methods and Tools Naluparayil J.
BT 104 The Christian Missionary Speeches in Acts Achandy J.
BT 105 The Question of Johannine Anti- Judaism Chanikuzhy J.
BT 106 Modern Language - German I Mundolickal P.
BT 107 Biblical Exegesis of the Fathers Kadeparambil A.
BT 108 Messianic Prophesies in Isaiah Kokkatt J.


Semester 2
BT 109 Biblical Greek II Prasad J.
BT 110 Biblical Hebrew II Nalpathilchira J.
BT 111 Modern Language - German II Mundolickal P.
BT 112 Interpretation of Bible in the Church Thondiparambil J.
BT 113 Fulfillment Quotations in Mathew Kokkatt J.
BT 114 Household and House Church in the Early Christianity Cyprian E.


Semester 3
BT 115 Biblical Greek III Prasad J.
BT 116 Biblical Hebrew III Nalpathilchira J.
BT 117 Selected Texts from John Therath A.
BT 118 Social Themes in Luke Acts Thayyil P.
BT 119 Romans 5 - 8 Prasad J.
BT 120 Rhetorical Analysis of Galatians Maleparambil J.


Semester 4
BT 121 Theology of Psalms (Seminar) Anaparambil J.
BT 122 Prophets and Social Justice Thondiparambil J.
BT 123 Selected Psalms (Seminar) Mayyattil J.
BT 124 Household codes in the NT (Seminar) Prasad J.
BT 125 Sabbath in Jewish and Christian Tradition Anaparambil J.
BT 126 Kingdom of God in Old Testament Mathirappilly S.

E) Specialization in Pastoral Theology & Counselling (PC)

PC 101 Towards an Ecclesiology for the Ecumenical Age Gregory R.B.
PC 102 Moral Theology Today Mynatty H.
PC 103 Parish as Liturgical Community Thoppil A.
PC 104 Marriage and Family Counselling Vinaya CHF
PC 105 Laity in the Mission of the Church Today Netto T.
PC 106 Youth Ministry and Counselling Manalel G.
PC 107 Pastoral Ministry Today Peter V.K.
PC 108 Christian Leadership Gregory R.B.

F) Seminars

STS 101 Fetish-Objects and Sacramental Presences
Within a Catholic Indian Context Dickinson C.
STS 102 Hindu-Christian Hermeneutics Kallungal M.
STS 103 Biblical Models in Ecclesiology Rebeiro M.
STS 104 Sex, Gender, Ethics Illathuparampil M.
STS 105 Theology of Love Gregory R.B.
PCS 106 Skills in Pastoral Counselling Manalel A.
PCS 107 Personal Laws, especially of Christian Marriage, Divorce, Succession and Adoption Kudiamssery X.
PCS 108 Evangelization through Mass Media Edappilly J.
PCS 109 Theology of BCC Gregory R.B.
SPS 110 Eco-Spirituality Keeranpara F.
SPS 111 Spiritual Direction Mundolickal P.
SPS 112 Priestly Spirituality Oliapuram J.
SPS 113 New Religious Movements Kundukulam V.
SPS 114 Pastoral Psychology and Counselling Manalel G.
BTS 115 The Development of Christian Theology Thondiparambil J.
BTS 116 Social Themes in Luke-Acts Thayyil P.

G) Electives

E 101 Social Concern in Luke Thayyil P.
E 102 Word Proclaimed and Celebrated in the Liturgy Thoppil A.
E 103 The Pastoral Vision of Pope Francis Mundolickal P.
E 104 Theological Aesthetics Gregory R.B.
E 105 Spirituality of the Psalms Thondiparambil J.
E 106 Pauline Spirituality Maleparambil J.
E 107 Life in the Spirit based on the Letter to the Romans Prasad J.
E 108 Liturgical Spirituality Nariculam A.
E 109 Life in the Spirit in the Indian Context Vattakkuzhy E
E 110 Spirituality of Communion Gregory R.B.
E 111 Different Methods of Meditation Valungal A.

SYNOPSIS

Biblical interpretation down through the Centuries

Due to the concrete socio-cultural contexts, the Word of God has been approached and studied with different methods and pre- suppositions down through the centuries. There is a sharp division between the pre-critical and critical periods in the interpretation of sacred scripture. This course makes an in-depth study of these approaches with special emphasis on the Catholic principles of interpretation.
Thondiparambil J.

Church as the Mystery of Communion

In light of modern scepticism on communion ecclesiology, this course seeks to provide a theological justification of koinonia as a most appropriate term for understanding the nature and function of the church. After providing a theological and biblical meaning of koinonia, the course examines the extent to which ekklesia and koinonia are connected, in this way, affirming the term’s suitability for ecclesiology. The course then aims at further consolidating its case by analyzing how the New Testament church lived out this fellowship with God and one another. Accordingly, communion ecclesiology is shown to be a highly significant way of approaching the church; indeed one with existential and salvific ramifications.
Gregory R.B.

Catholic Theology of Religion

This course deals with the question of Uniqueness of Christ and Unicity of Church in the context of religious pluralism. The studies made by Ernst Troeltsch, Arnold Toynbee, Karl Gustav Yung and others show that religious pluralism is a positive value of the contemporary culture. We have both exclusive and inclusive attitudes in the Bible and they are interpreted in terms of Jesus’ open attitude towards other believers. The course will also evaluate the various trends - Ecclesiocentrism, Christocentrism, Theocentrism, Soteriocentrism – in the light of the Church documents from Second Vatican Council to Dominus Iesus.
Kundukulam V.

Sermon on the Mountain

The Gospel of Matthew demonstrates a particular interest in the teachings of Jesus, which the author presents in Five Major Discourses. The first discourse, the Sermon on the Mountain, which is the longest Discourse, is programmatic in its nature. This course ventures to explore this discourse in detail, with a special focus on the theme of discipleship in Matthew and its relevance in the context of present day India.
Nalpathilchira J.

Mission in the Synoptic Gospels

The theme of mission is fundamental to the NT. This course undertakes a detailed study of selected passages from the Synoptic Gospels dealing with the theme of mission. Special attention is given to the universal mission-commissioning in Matt 28,16-20, with a special focus on the Indian context.
Nalpathilchira J.

Postmodernity and Christianity

The purpose of this course is to understand properly the phenomenon of postmodernity, realize about its impact on religion and find out responses that help Church to translate faith meaningfully to the present era. To arrive at this objective, the course will deal with the thoughts of Jean-François Lyotard, Jacques Derrida, Michael Baudrillard, Richard Rorty and Umberto Eco, describe the salient features of postmodern age, and examine the metamorphosis that takes place in the field of Christian faith. With reference to the writings of Lieven Boevet, John D. Caputo, James K.A. Smith, Van Erp Stephan and Denis Villepelet attempts will be made to discover efficient means of responding to the above-said challenges.
Kundukulam V.

Christology in the Asian Context

Christology is always an interpretation of the significance of Jesus Christ for the Christian community in particular time and place. The context of the people has an important role to determine the way Christology is articulated. “Who do you say that I am?” Each generation must answer this question in their own time. The emergence of contextual theology has brought with it an awakening of contextual Christologies. External and internal factors have necessitated the development of contextual Christology. Thus we have Latin American Christology, African Christology, Asian Christology, etc. This course discusses the main trends in Asian Christology, such as Tribal Christology, Asian Feminist Christology, Islamic Christology, Minjung Christology, Dalit Christology, etc. It also aims at finding the scope for dialogue with non-Christian religious traditions, culture and ideologies.
Panjikaran S.

Christology in the Asian Context

Christology is always an interpretation of the significance of Jesus Christ for the Christian community in particular time and place. The context of the people has an important role to determine the way Christology is articulated. “Who do you say that I am?” Each generation must answer this question in their own time. The emergence of contextual theology has brought with it an awakening of contextual Christologies. External and internal factors have necessitated the development of contextual Christology. Thus we have Latin American Christology, African Christology, Asian Christology, etc. This course discusses the main trends in Asian Christology, such as Tribal Christology, Asian Feminist Christology, Islamic Christology, Minjung Christology, Dalit Christology, etc. It also aims at finding the scope for dialogue with non-Christian religious traditions, culture and ideologies.
Panjikaran S.

Contemporary Issues in Sacramental Theology

This course offers a brief look at a number of contemporary issues in Sacramental theology. The call in the Vatican II documents for the revision of all the formal sacraments of the Church was a great blessing, but a decade later, after each of the sacraments had in fact been revised, it became abundantly clear to many that a great number of issues still remained to be resolved. Among the contemporary issues in Sacramental theology, there are really two major ones that overpower and affect all others. The first is that the medieval theology of clerical power, which has served us so well for centuries, had been fading out for some decades now. But while this theology is fading out, an equally well-thought-out system is not yet present to take its place. The second major issue, indeed the central one for most Christians, is what the revised sacraments actually mean for believers today. The question became how to bridge the gap between an official Catholic understanding of the sacraments, which is still tied to the medieval Thomistic synthesis, as can be seen in much of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and the meaning that each of the sacraments has today for the individual Christian. The problem is not only that a paradigm shift has been taking place in Catholic theology, but also that a shift is taking place in the consciousness of the Catholic people.
Pulickal S.

History of Medieval and Post-Tridentine Spirituality

Hugh of St. Victor, St. Dominic and the Friars Preachers, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Francis, the Friars Minor and St. Bonaventure. The German Mystics: Eckhart, Tauler, Suso. St. Catherine of Siena, St. Ignatius Loyola, St. Teresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross and St. Francis de Sales.
Cheruparambil T.

The Patristic and Early Monastic Spirituality

The spirituality of the Apostolic Fathers and the influence of Gnosticism in Christian spirituality. Monasticism in the East :Eremitical and Cenobitical life. The Cappadocian Fathers, Evagrius, pseudo-Dionysius. Monasticism in the West: John Cassian, St. Augustine and St. Benedict.
Kadeparambil A.

Contemporary Spirituality

The spirituality of St. Francis de Sales, St. Therese of Lisieux, Elizabeth of Trinity, Charles de Foucauld and Post-Vatican Saints. Vatican II and the universal call to holiness. Towards a spirituality of daily life. Greater Systematization of Spiritual Theology.
Mundolickal P.

The Progressive Stages of Prayer

Traditional classifications: Ascetical and Mystical; Purgative, Illuminative and Unitive Ways; the seven mansions of the ‘Interior Castle’ and the ‘Ladder’ of John Climacus. The positive and negative aspects of these classifications.
Valungal A.

Biblical Greek I

The objective of this course is the mastery of the basic morphology of NT Greek, command of a fundamental Greek vocabulary, familiarity with Greek in transliteration, knowledge of the more important points of syntax and an ability to translate simple sentences from Greek.
Achandy J.

Biblical Hebrew I

This course aims at the mastery of the basic morphology of OT Hebrew, command of a fundamental Hebrew vocabulary, familiarity with Hebrew in transliteration, knowledge of the more important points of syntax and an ability to translate simple sentences from Hebrew.
Chanikuzhy J.

Biblical Greek II & III

These two advanced courses in NT Greek focus on the detailed study of selected texts from the NT; special attention will be paid to the difficulties of NT syntax and style.
Prasad J.

Biblical Hebrew II & III
These two advanced course in OT Hebrew focus on the detailed study of selected texts from the OT; greater emphasis is given to the syntax and style of OT Hebrew.
Nalpathilchira J.

The Christian Missionary Speeches in Acts

Aim of this course is to rediscover the contextualization method of the Good News in the early church. Book of Acts, as the only work of the early church history in the NT, reports some missionary speeches by the dominant apostles Peter and Paul in different religious, geographical and cultural contexts of their time, proclaiming Jesus Christ as the unique Saviour of mankind. A study of these speeches, analyzing their respective authors, audiences, contexts and the contents, and highlighting the method applied for an effective communication, will enlighten any modern missionary or pastor in communicating the same Good News not only in the religious pluralistic context of India but also in this large globalised but multi-pluralistic world. This course requires an active individual involvement of the participants.
Achandy J.

The Question of Johannine Anti-Judaism

The position that the Fourth Gospel is anti-Judaic is thoroughly argued and vehemently refuted in the scholarly circles. The all pervasive dualism in the Fourth Gospel, its penchant statements (Eg: “You are the sons of the devil” [Jn 8,34]), the unique Johannine use of the term hoi Ioudaioi, Jesus’ extensive discourses with the Jews etc., seemingly widen the distance between the Jews and the believers of Jesus. This course envisages to familiarize the students with the issues involved in the so-called “Johannine Anti-Judaism” and with various positions taken by different scholars in this regard. The goal of the course is to help the students to approach, understand and interpret the Fourth Gospel honestly and with historical and social sensitivity.
Chanikuzhy J.

The Prophetic concern for Social Justice

Are the prophets reformers or revolutionaries? This question is studied with special attention to Amos, the first of the canonical prophets, who is also known as the prophet of social justice. This theme has special significance for developing nations.
Thondiparambil J.

The Development of Christian Theology

Christian theological reflection has been growing in its meeting with the various cultures and challenges. The historical character of the theological understanding of the mysteries of faith is also a help in the ecumenical discussions today. The course lays stress on the historical background of the development of doctrines. It brings out at the same time the on-going dialogue between faith and culture.
Thondiparambil J.

Social Themes in Luke Acts

St. Luke, in his two-volume work, presents the “Jesus-event” and its significance taking into account the social situation of his readers. This is evident from his emphasis on certain social themes like ‘concern for the poor’, ‘universalism’ and ‘equality of man and woman’, In the course we discuss the social concern of Luke as presented in Luke-Acts. The purpose of the course is to create an awareness regarding the responsibility of individual Christians and Christian communities to involve actively in the struggle for the creation of a just society.
Thayyil P.

Hindu-Christian Hermeneutics

The aim of the course is to familiarize the students with the complexities involved in an effort to understand Hindu religious reality and Hindu-Christian engagements. Since understanding occurs only through interpretation, the first objective of the course is to identify a relatively adequate hermeneutical approach towards religiosity as well as inter-religiosity. After the preliminary hermeneutical investigations, this course will offer a succinct understanding of Hinduism. This part of the course will make the students (i) aware of the definitional problems surrounding Hinduism, (ii) familiar with the complexity of and the internal diversity in the Hindu religious reality (iii) understand and explain the Hindu religious and philosophical literature, especially some key notions and issues like dharma, varna, sphota, samskara, Brahman-Atman identity, etc., and (iv) have an overview of the Hindu religious world in India and abroad with special reference to its origin and development. The second part of the course will address the question of Hindu-Christian engagements where the students will gain awareness into the problems and possibilities of interactions between Hinduism and Christianity. The first part of the course will cover: Indus Valley Civilization and a brief history of Hinduism, Vedic Religion and Hindu cosmology, Dharma and Hindu social organization, Hindu Rites of Passage (Samskâra), Hindu theory of language - Hindu philosophical systems, Hindu epics - Hindu devotionalism, Hindu deities, art, and worship rituals, and Vedanta and Hindu reformation. The second part of the course will focus on the question of Hindu-Christian dialogue and the specific case of the dialogue between Catholicism and Hinduism.
Kallungal M.

Fetish-objects and Sacramental Presences within a Catholic- Indian Context

The purpose of this seminar is to bring two particular perspectives on ‘divine’ material objects—the anthropological and the Catholic theological—into dialogue with one another in order to explore both the resonances and dissonances that exist between them. Taking as a starting point the general overlap between ‘fetish objects’ and sacraments, this seminar will explore what defines each ‘object’ and how the presence of the ‘divine’ could be said to reside within them. In detail, the seminar will focus on two significant texts to note, among others we will study: firstly, William Pietz’s series of articles on the history of the fetish object, and, secondly, Caroline Walker Bynum’s book Christian Materiality, which focuses on the history of medieval Catholic sacramental practices and perceptions. By putting these two points of view in dialogue with each other (along with some additional sources noted below), students will be encouraged to reflect upon how the social, political, economic and religious forces of (post)colonialism continue to have an impact upon how fetishobjects, sacraments, ‘idolatry’ and ‘iconography’ are all understood within a contemporary Indian-Catholic context.
Colby Dickinson


Parables of Jesus

Jesus’ parables are among the best known and most influential stories in the world. Parables were the means Jesus used most frequently to explain the kingdom of God and to show the character of God and the expectations that God has for human beings. That message has often been subverted. Jesus’ parables have been abused and forced to serve various purposes – from ancient theological purposes to modern ideological and pastoral ones. This course will explore selected parables in the Synoptic Gospels. Making use of the conventional tools of redaction criticism, attempts will be made to delineate the traditional material incorporated in the parables. The course also examines the parables making use of the synchronic reading of the text.
Nalpathilchira J.

Moses’ First Address (Deut 1–4)

The first four chapters of the Book of Deuteronomy narrate Moses’ talk at the eastern bank of Jordan which, according to the organization of the book, Moses delivered the morning of the very day of his death. This course undertakes an exegetical investigation of these four chapters of Deuteronomy. Due attention is given to the meaning and syntax of the text. Important theological themes that are present in these introductory chapters will be highlighted, keeping in mind their relevance in modern times.
Nalpathilchira J.

The First Letter to Timothy

The First Letter to Timothy is the longest and most detailed of the so-called ‘Pastoral Letters’ attributed to St. Paul. It is a perfect example of ‘inculturation’. The original Christian message, going back to Jesus’ preaching and the preaching about Jesus in Palestine, and transformed for the first time in the proclamation of St. Paul, makes a further step towards the Hellenistic world. This course intends to explore the letter exegetically and tries to understand how the paradigm of inculturation outlined in the letter can serve as a model for evangelization and inculturation in the multi-cultural, religious, ethnic scenario of India.
Nalpathilchira J.